Exploration 1 Being A Scientist Exploring Science

Being A Scientist 4 Copyright 1997, Macro Press

Initial testing is tricky. Make sure the students understand their roles.. A good way to do this is to divide the group into measurer, recorder, observer, and thrower tasks. Wide spread parallel lines, test tracks, will help. Poorly constructed planes could easily fly as much as eight (8) feet to the side.

When the testing is completed, return to the classroom for analysis and discussion.

 

4. BACK ON THE GROUND

We have completed the flight test program that answered HOW the planes would fly. Now, we try to answer WHY. Part of research and testing is analysis. In your Research Teams, you will do analysis. During the flight tests you measured all the distances. To make them meaningful, make the average calculations, and enter this information on the table. Verify your results with your team mates.

Was one type of plane more successful at your test than others? Why do you think that is true? What was the average for each plane your team flew? For straight line distance, how many feet. I will use the Numbered Heads Together approach to get your responses. Allow time for discussion.

What are your results? We will start with (number). Get results from the teams. Some of the data will be useful for charting in math using the two models flown by different members or teams of the class. The variations in results for a class of 32 in 8 teams flying two different plane styles can be significant. (This may be a week's worth of math data!)

After Team by Team reports, ask for indications of better than average performance by Broad Wing, by Narrow Wing. Chart this information or, minimally, record numbers. Is there a trend? You may need to explain trend. You probably will have one. Useful extensions are considering throwing style and force (note differences in results within teams for the same plane), possible differences in wind for different team locations, or even differences in force applied to the throw.Initial testing is tricky. Make sure the students understand their roles.. A good way to do this is to divide the group into measurer, recorder, observer, and thrower tasks. Wide spread parallel lines, test tracks, will help. Poorly constructed planes could easily fly as much as eight (8) feet to the side.

When the testing is completed, return to the classroom for analysis and discussion.