Exploration 1 Being A Scientist Exploring Science

Being A Scientist 2 Copyright 1997, Macro Press

Technology

Management Suggestions:

Prior to the flight test phase, building the launch boxes, and allowing the bonding materials to bond might be a good idea. It would shorten dead time.

For the flight testing, try to get help from some parents or older students. This will keep things moving. Even with the designed devices to control launch force, it is unlikely that the airplanes will all fly straight, or the same distance. Doing the flight test outdoors is recommended, with some space between teams. Also, providing parallel lanes for testing for the teams will simplify both management and increase test results reporting.

 

 

Time Allotment:

Introduction: 15 minutes

Preparing for Launch Boxes: 15-25 minutes

Flight Time: 25-40 minutes depending on class size, facility

Back on the Ground: 25 minutes

What Do The Words Mean?: 15 minutes

Student Text: 10 Minutes

Discussion: 10 minutes

 

 

Procedure:

1. INTRODUCTION

Say, A good scientist always builds on known work. We will do that this week. Remember the Flight Force Diagram from the activities before the first exploration. During our first Exploration we tested the planes for distance along the flight path. During those tests, the same planes did not perform exactly the same for all testers. What do you think might have caused the differences? Accept all answers.

 

You are working as excellent scientists. You are naming possible variables. Variables are the reasons why tests are not always the same. For this Exploration, we will control the amount of thrust (power applied to the throw). How do you think that we can do that? List student ideas.

The next activity will be to create one means to control the amount of thrust applied. This will make it possible to get the plane to fly the same. The tests should be repeatable. The method used in this exploration is NOT the only method of controlling force applied to the plane, but it is a good example of how scientists test.

 

2. BUILDING REPEATABILITY

Assign teams of four. Pass out ER-1, Flight Test. Fill in the Exploration Report, just like you did for the first exploration. It will also go in your SCIENTIST'S NOTEBOOK. A scientist always lists all of the test conditions.

Pass out RM-3, shoe boxes, rubber bands, paper clips, tape, and scissors. For Students with Disabilities, it may be advisable to do the slot cutting for them. Draw the launch box design on the board as you instruct the students on its construction. Build the boxesNOTE:

The launcher can stress the planes, especially if used improperly. Do not hesitate to build new ones at any time.

 

The goal here is to teach good science, not rigid adherence to procedures

Management Suggestions:

Prior to the flight test phase, building the launch boxes, and allowing the bonding materials to bond might be a good idea. It would shorten dead time.

For the flight testing, try to get help from some parents or older students. This will keep things moving. Even with the designed devices to control launch force, it is unlikely that the airplanes will all fly straight, or the same distance. Doing the flight test outdoors is recommended, with some space between teams. Also, providing parallel lanes for testing for the teams will simplify both management and increase test results reporting.

Time Allotment: Introduction: 15 minutes

Preparing for Launch Boxes: 15-25 minutes

Flight Time: 25-40 minutes depending on class size, facility

Back on the Ground: 25 minutes

What Do The Words Mean?: 15 minutes

Student Text: 10 Minutes

Discussion: 10 minutes

 

 

Procedure:

1. INTRODUCTION

Say, A good scientist always builds on known work. We will do that this week. Remember the Flight Force Diagram from the activities before the first exploration. During our first Exploration we tested the planes for distance along the flight path. During those tests, the same planes did not perform exactly the same for all testers. What do you think might have caused the differences? Accept all answers.

 

You are working as excellent scientists. You are naming possible variables. Variables are the reasons why tests are not always the same. For this Exploration, we will control the amount of thrust (power applied to the throw). How do you think that we can do that? List student ideas.

The next activity will be to create one means to control the amount of thrust applied. This will make it possible to get the plane to fly the same. The tests should be repeatable. The method used in this exploration is NOT the only method of controlling force applied to the plane, but it is a good example of how scientists test.

 

2. BUILDING REPEATABILITY

Assign teams of four. Pass out ER-1, Flight Test. Fill in the Exploration Report, just like you did for the first exploration. It will also go in your SCIENTIST'S NOTEBOOK. A scientist always lists all of the test conditions.

Pass out RM-3, shoe boxes, rubber bands, paper clips, tape, and scissors. For Students with Disabilities, it may be advisable to do the slot cutting for them. Draw the launch box design on the board as you instruct the students on its construction. Build the boxes